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It was a Sunday afternoon. The sun was descending from its high place in the sky and frost had formed on the windows from the cold wintery air outside. Two students and I sat in my living room discussing their lives as students and followers of Christ. We talked about genetic testing, the pros and cons of commercial farms, sports, greed, the authority of Scripture, church worship practices, and homosexuality. Two hours, and a few cups of tea later, they departed and I was left to reflect on our discussion. 

I found myself both encouraged and amazed at the way in which our conversation flowed from topic to topic, academics and faith, research, Scripture and prayer woven together to form the rich fabric of our lives together. In that moment, I realized that this was what the faith community in conversation was supposed to look like; the dwelling of the message of Christ among us as we talked and taught one another in all wisdom and grace, being filled with the Spirit and with thanksgiving to our great God (Eph. 5:15-20, Col. 3:15-17).

Writing on Augustine's Confessions, Dr. David Rylaarsdam conveys the significance of this sort of faith community in conversation on the theologians conversion and Christian life:

In his early life, its theological reflection done with others that helps Augustine slowly convert more and more to God. On his own, his theology is often stuck in ruts: he thinks of God too much in bodily terms, he doesn't balance God's transcendence and immanence, he thinks Scripture is too unsophisticated to deserve his attention. It's his reflections with others that keep him moving forward. The more he is drawn into the faith community, the more he converses with this community's deep tradition of reading life and Scripture, the more he accelerates toward full conversion...It's through this community of theological reflectors that God's voice breaks through the stubborn ears of Augustine's heart. [1] 

All too often, we isolate our lives from the story of Scripture, from the grand redemptive drama unfolding on its pages and extending into human history up to the present day. We fail to see our place in, as Calvin put it, the "theater of God" and how Scripture and life are woven together. As a result, our spiritual lives can seem dry, we can grow cold in our affections towards God and obedience to His ways, and we can become detached from the world around us, failing to love and serve others; proclaiming in word and deed the beauty, truth, and hope of the gospel in our various sphere(s) of influence. 

A lot of this is born out of a failure to engage in theological reflection as a faith community. We read the Bible on our own; worship in large, darkened auditoriums as individuals; we pray only in our closets at home. This is why conversation in community is so important; a space for unity and diversity, a safe space for questions and doubt, and a space of encouragement and challenge in walking in the way of Christ. In the case of Augustine, time and again, it moved him beyond the barriers his heart and mind had set up, propelling him forward in taking hold of Christ in faith. 

The university is an incredible place for Christians to enter into theological reflection in conversation. It is a place that offers a rich diversity of believers from around the world, with different experiences and viewpoints. It is a place that, perhaps more explicitly than others, sits at the intersection between faith and everyday life, work, recreation and God, the church and the world. How are you engaging in the conversation?

I challenge you in your time at university to theologically reflect on your life. But I also challenge you to do so, not merely on your own, but in conversation with others in the faith community. This will require intentionality, it may require sacrifice (of time), and it will probably have moments of both joy and pain, but it will prove its worth as you grow closer to God, deeper in fellowship with one another, and more confident of your place in God's mission in the world. So let the lordship of Christ in all spheres of life, the rich diversity of the body of Christ, and the powerful living and active Word of God all form you into a mature citizen of the Kingdom of God. 

 

[1] David Rylaarsdam, For God So Loved The World, ed. Arie C. Leder (Belleville, ON: Essence Publishing, 2006), 206. 

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